Please be sure that you use an article from the Georgia Military College Database. I got a 0 on the last paper because it said it was plagiarized.

Information on Romanticism and the Week Three assignments is presented below:
What if reason is not the defining characteristic of what it means to be human? What if our emotions, feelings, and the imagination are greater sources of knowledge, awareness, and insight?
This revolutionary concept informs Romanticism, a nineteenth-century movement in literature and philosophy that stressed the predominance of imagination and emotions over reason, and also asserted the powers of the individual. A study of the different literary periods/movements reveals that they are framed by forceful changes in society, such as wars, scientific advances, and demographic and cultural shifts. If “reason” is the mantra of the Enlightenment, then “revolution” best describes the new spirit of the Romantic Period.
In the final decades of the eighteenth century, the war for American independence and the French Revolution both reflect a challenge to traditional institutions of power and a desire for more individual freedoms, but it is the Industrial Revolution that perhaps has the greatest impact on the development of Romantic thought. Several of the main ideals of Romanticism are individualism: the belief that the individual is at the center of life and experience; sensibility: a reliance on one’s emotions and feelings as guides to truth and conduct; and an emphasis on appreciating physical nature (the natural world).

This week will be a busy one, as you will have the regular two discussion forums, a weekly quiz, and an article analysis is due by the end of the week.

To prepare for the discussion forums, be sure to review the Bloom’s Literature articles on Romanticism and the other resources on writing about character / characterization in literature.
If you have ever considered making a deal with the Devil, be sure to read Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe’s Faust before you do so. This drama, considered Goethe’s masterpiece, is the most famous version of a classic morality tale in which a man of learning essentially trades his soul in order to gain higher knowledge.
Because Faust is a lengthy work (read part I only), you will need to begin reading early in the week. For the Faust Discussion Forum main post, due on Wednesday, March 31, by 11:55 p.m. EST, you will answer several questions about the characterization of either Faust (the protagonist) or Mephistopheles. Characterization is the process by which a writer makes a character seem believable or realistic to readers; in your analysis, you should consider the character’s attitude toward the world, his strengths or weaknesses, and what motivates the character’s behavior/actions. Faust is a verse drama, like Tartuffe, but since it is not divided into acts and scenes, just include the line numbers in the parenthetical citations (For example: “So it’s agreed, you have my full consent. / Divert the soul of Faust from its true source” (lines 331-332). The bibliographic citation for the GMC Library edition of Faust is listed below:

Works Cited
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang, et al. Faust : A Tragedy, Parts One and Two, Fully Revised. Vol. Fully revised edition, Yale University Press, 2014. E-book. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?

For the Week 3 Critical Thinking Exercise, you will select one Romantic ideal portrayed in Faust and explain how it challenges or responds to Enlightenment views. Your initial post is due by 11:55 p.m. EST on Friday, April 2. With both forums, try to be original in your analysis and use of examples and details. If several classmates have already discussed a character trait or Romantic ideal in their main posts, try to choose a different element or perspective in your main post.
Before you take the Week 3 Quiz, be sure to finish reading Faust, Part I and review the work, focusing on the main characters and the main events of the plot. The Week 3 Quiz closes on Sunday, April 4, at 11:55 p.m.
Finally, for the Article Analysis assignment, you will locate one critical article from the GMC Library databases (Bloom’s Literature, Literary Reference Center, or the Literature Resource Center) about one of the works read thus far (Tartuffe, Candide, or Faust) and type a 500-word (minimum length) analysis that includes the areas listed below. Feel free to use the same article that you selected for the Response Paper last week; just make sure that the article provides analysis of the literary work. As stated in the “Article Analysis—Instructions”:
In your analysis, you should clearly identify the author’s thesis and main points by SUMMARIZING the article. Your summary should be no more than 150 words.You should then provide a critique of these main points and EXPLAIN how this article’s argument is relevant or convincing to you (or not), and why.You should also include in this analysis a QUOTE and a PARAPHRASE from the article, with appropriate in-text citations.
ARTICLE ANALYSIS ON CANDIDE. I ATTACHED THE CANDIDE or you can also do the Faust. I attached the sample from last year.
Part of writing an effective analytical research paper involves using evidence directly from your primary texts (the literature itself) as well as the works of other critics and scholars (secondary texts). Therefore, you will need to be able to analyze these secondary works, and to accurately quote, paraphrase and summarize these outside sources in your own essays. This assignment helps build these research skills. In fact, the article you analyze here (and the literature on which it’s based) could even become part of your research paper topic in future weeks, if you choose.
For this assignment, choose a critical article from one of the GMC library databases that makes a clear argument about any one of the stories you’ve read for the class so far. The article you choose must provide more than basic biographical information and plot summary; it must make an opinionated argument about some aspect of the literary work. Your complete analysis should be at least 500 words in length.
Analysis
In your analysis, you should clearly identify the author’s thesis and main points by SUMMARIZINGthe article. Your summary should be no more than 150 words.You should then provide a critique of these main points and EXPLAIN how this article’s argument is relevant or convincing to you (or not), and why.You should also include in this analysis a QUOTE and a PARAPHRASE from the article, with appropriate in-text citations.MLA Style
Your paper must be formatted according to MLA format (this includes having a header, double spacing, etc.)All quotations, paraphrases and summaries MUST be cited using MLA format.You must include a works-cited page at the end of your paper.For more information about MLA style, you should view the Purdue OWL’s pages on MLA: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_formatting_and_style_guide.html.Mechanics, Grammar, and Punctuation
All written assignments should be mechanically and grammatically correct with proper punctuation.For more information on each of these, you should view the Purdue OWL’s General Writing Resources page: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/general_writing_introduction.htmlStructure
The introduction should include a clear thesis statement. It should also clearly identify the title of the article you’ve chosen and the author’s name.Each body paragraph should have a clear topic sentence that relates back to the thesis. The information in each paragraph should relate to the topic sentence. In the body paragraphs, you may want to focus on individual points made by the author.

This assignment is will be assessed using the Article Analysis